Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios Complete Redesign of London's Hayward Gallery


© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

England-based Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios have completed their redesign of the Hayward Gallery which transforms the iconic cultural venue into a modern space which allows Southbank Centre to continue to provide “more access, to more arts, for more people.”


© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

Built in 1951, the Southbank Centre is one of the great cultural institutions of the 20th century holding a special place in the London art scene, including the landmark Brutalist architecture of the Queen Elizabeth Hall and the Hayward Gallery. The LCC Architect’s Department Special Works Division designed these spaces in the early 1960s and the Hayward Gallery opened in 1968 to become a world-renowned contemporary art gallery.


© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios‘ redesign is primarily a conservation project with the aim of replacing building services, improving environmental performance, upgrading infrastructure to support a growing arts program. Their proposal was introduced after plans for a larger expansion were abandoned because the spaces underneath the Southbank Undercroft, which lies beneath the Queen Elizabeth Hall of the gallery, had become a popular hangout for skateboarders. This space was preserved and is currently being renovated to improve Londoner’s access to creative spaces throughout the city.


© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

The building’s 66 iconic pyramid skylights and ceilings underneath have undergone a complete redesign and now allow the galleries to be filled with natural light. Inside, the galleries have replaced the terrazzo floors, cleaned the interior concrete surfaces, retaining their highly textured board-marked finishes, removed, cleaned and re-fixed the ceilings in the lower galleries, and provided new acoustic ceiling coffers as part of the redesigned pyramids in the upper galleries. Environmental controls have been completely replaced along with mechanical plant and all electrical services. In addition to various digital and technological advances, the redesign of the roof has also allowed the addition of 90 rigging points to support the hanging of more art.


© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

© Morley Von Sternberg

News via: Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios.


Source: ArchDaily

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